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The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 13 - The Stories of Conan, Part 1

“Hither came Conan…” The world’s most famous barbarian comes to The Appendix N Podcast to tread the works of lesser fantasy authors beneath his sandled feet. We are talking about the earliest Conan stories written by Robert E. Howard, though not necessarily the first published.

 www.nobleknight.com

 Howard, R. E.: “Conan” series

Robert E. Howard
born 1906, died 1936

Born in Texas, the only son of a traveling country physician. Traveling with his father exposed him to firsthand tales of violence that would influence his writing, and like many people of the time he was greatly interested in the sport of boxing. Howard’s love of poetry and literature came from his mother, Hester. His earliest stories were historical fiction about Vikings, Arabs and lots of violence. His earliest influences were Jack London, Rudyard Kipling and Thomas Bullfinch.

In August 1930, Howard wrote to Weird Tales in praise “The Rats in the Walls” by H. P. Lovecraft. The letter was forwarded to Lovecraft and the two authors became friends. Howard is considered to have contributed to the Lovecraft Mythos. The correspondence between Howard and Lovecraft contained a lengthy discussion on a frequent element in Howard’s writing, civilization versus barbarism. Howard held that civilization was inherently corrupt and fragile.

Howard wrote his first Conan story in 1932, adapting an unpublished story “By This Axe I Rule!” featuring one of Howard’s other protagonists, Kull the Conqueror. Conan would go on to become Howard’s most enduring character.

Howard sadly committed suicide in 1936 upon learning that his mother was dying of tuberculosis.

“The Phoenix on the Sword” first published in Weird Tales, December 1932
“The Frost Giant’s Daughter” first published as “The Gods of the North” in Weird Tales, 1932
“The God in the Bowl” reject by Weird Tales, published posthumously in Space Science Fiction, September 1952

 

Co-host:

Jeffrey Wikstrom

website - jeffwik.com

email - jeffwik@gmail.com

 

My guest:

Peter Foxhoven

 

http://www.thetomeshow.com

thetomeshow@gmail.com

 

Geoffrey Winn
gdwinn@comcast.net

 

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Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 12 - Dwellers in the Mirage

A Viking and an American Indian walk into the Alaskan wilderness. If that sounds like a joke, you haven’t read Dwellers in the Mirage, the thrilling sci-fi adventure story by A. Merrit. Listen to my guests and I talk about this story that features a Cthulhu-esque deity, a Conan-esque warrior king, and half-naked warrior women in a hidden mountain valley.

 

www.nobleknight.com

 

Merrit, A.: CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al

 

“The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merrit” — Gary Gygax

 

Abraham Merrit

born 1884, died 1943

 

Wikipedia names H. Rider Haggard, Robert W. Chambers, Helena Blavatsky and Gertrude Barrows Bennett (writing as Francis Stevens) as “heavy influences.”

 

He was a major influence on Appendix N authors H. P. Lovecraft and Michael Moorcock. He was referenced in the Lensman series by E. E. Smith.

 

Born in Beverly, New Jersey. Primarily a journalist. Assistant editor of The American Weekly from 1912 to 1937 and then editor until his death in 1943.

 

Merrit’s first fantasy story was “Through the Dragon Glass” (1917)

 

Dwellers in the Mirage was originally serialized in six parts in the magazine Argosy beginning on January 23, 1932.

 

For the article references in this show: http://skullsinthestars.com/2009/02/22/a-merritts-dwellers-in-the-mirage/

 

Co-host:

Jeffrey Wikstrom

website - jeffwik.com

email - jeffwik@gmail.com

 

My guest:

Jeremiah McCoy

website - https://thebasicsofthegame.wordpress.com

tumblr - http://thebasicsofthegame.tumblr.com

YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/user/brothersaul

 

http://www.thetomeshow.com

thetomeshow@gmail.com

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Dungeons & Dragons Classics


Appendix N Podcast - Episode 11 - The Complete Works of H. P. Lovecraft (Part 3)

Third part of a three-part series. My guests and I discuss The Call of Cthulhu, the most famous story by H. P. Lovecraft featuring his iconic creation, and we also talk about the roleplaying game of the same name.

www.nobleknight.com

Lovecraft, H. P. The Complete Works.

H. P. Lovecraft

born 1890, died 1937

Born in Providence, RI, son of a traveling salesman and a woman who could trace her ancestry back to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. When Lovecraft was only 3 years old, his father was placed in a psychiatric institution and died 5 years later, as Lovecraft himself claimed, of paralysis brought on by “nervous exhaustion.” Lovecraft’s mother suffered from hysteria and depression and died at the same hospital about 23 years later.

Lovecraft was raised by his mother and his mother’s family, including his grandfather who was a businessman. It was this grandfather who encouraged him to read and interested him in tales of Gothic horror.

Lovecraft was an intelligent but sickly child who grew into a gaunt, pale adult. He suffered a nervous breakdown prior to his high school graduation and never received his diploma. Although today he is regarded by fans as one of the greatest literary geniuses of the 20th century, he was never financially successful in his own time, partly due to his own unwillingness. He was friends with many other writers of his day, including most famously Robert E. Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian.

He was briefly married to a woman named Sonia Greene and lived with her in New York City, where he was famously miserable.

Lovecraft returned to Providence in 1926 and lived there until his death in 1937. He was diagnosed with cancer of the small intestine and died in poverty.

Today the images of H. P. Lovecraft and his most famous creation, the monster Cthulhu, are well known to gamers. Cthulhu appears on t-shirts, in board games, card games, roleplaying games, and video games. He is credited as an inspiration by many, many horror and fantasy writers, and filmmakers who came after him. And yet his name is relatively unknown outside of geek and gamer culture, probably less recognizable to the general public than Edgar Allen Poe and Steven King.

My guests:

Dan Cmil

Eric Paquette

Jeffrey Wikstrom - The Lurking Fear

website - jeffwik.com

email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Email us to find out how you can get involved!

http://www.thetomeshow.com

thetomeshow@gmail.com

Geoffrey Winn

gdwinn@comcast.net

 

Support the show, shop below...


Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 10 - The Complete Works of H.P. Loveraft (Part 2)

Second part of a three-part series. More selected stories by H. P. Lovecraft. In this episode, my special guests and I are talking about Herbert West – Reanimator, The Lurking Fear, and The Rats in the Walls.


www.nobleknight.com

Lovecraft, H. P. The Complete Works.
H. P. Lovecraft
born 1890, died 1937

Born in Providence, RI, son of a traveling salesman and a woman who could trace her ancestry back to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. When Lovecraft was only 3 years old, his father was placed in a psychiatric institution and died 5 years later, as Lovecraft himself claimed, of paralysis brought on by “nervous exhaustion.” Lovecraft’s mother suffered from hysteria and depression and died at the same hospital about 23 years later.

Lovecraft was raised by his mother and his mother’s family, including his grandfather who was a businessman. It was this grandfather who encouraged him to read and interested him in tales of Gothic horror.

Lovecraft was an intelligent but sickly child who grew into a gaunt, pale adult. He suffered a nervous breakdown prior to his high school graduation and never received his diploma. Although today he is regarded by fans as one of the greatest literary geniuses of the 20th century, he was never financially successful in his own time, partly due to his own unwillingness. He was friends with many other writers of his day, including most famously Robert E. Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian.

He was briefly married to a woman named Sonia Greene and lived with her in New York City, where he was famously miserable.
Lovecraft returned to Providence in 1926 and lived there until his death in 1937. He was diagnosed with cancer of the small intestine and died in poverty.

Today the images of H. P. Lovecraft and his most famous creation, the monster Cthulhu, are well known to gamers. Cthulhu appears on t-shirts, in board games, card games, roleplaying games, and video games. He is credited as an inspiration by many, many horror and fantasy writers, and filmmakers who came after him. And yet his name is relatively unknown outside of geek and gamer culture, probably less recognizable to the general public than Edgar Allen Poe and Steven King.

My guests:

Dan Cmil - Herbert West – Reanimator


Jeffrey Wikstrom - The Lurking Fear
website - jeffwik.com
email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Jay Kint - The Rats in the Walls
blog - expertisedice.com
Twitter - @icosahedron

Email us to find out how you can get involved!
http://www.thetomeshow.com
thetomeshow@gmail.com

Geoffrey Winn
gdwinn@comcast.net

Support the show, shop below...

Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 9 - The Complete Works of H.P. Loveraft

For the month of October, in honor of Halloween, I bring you selected stories by H. P. Lovecraft. In this episode, I’m talking about The Doom That Came To Sarnath, From Beyond, The Temple, and The Music of Erich Zann. With my special guests, of course.

www.nobleknight.com

Lovecraft, H. P. The Complete Works.

H. P. Lovecraft

born 1890, died 1937

Born in Providence, RI, son of a traveling salesman and a woman who could trace her ancestry back to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. When Lovecraft was only 3 years old, his father was placed in a psychiatric institution and died 5 years later, as Lovecraft himself claimed, of paralysis brought on by “nervous exhaustion.” Lovecraft’s mother suffered from hysteria and depression and died at the same hospital about 23 years later.

Lovecraft was raised by his mother and his mother’s family, including his grandfather who was a businessman. It was this grandfather who encouraged him to read and interested him in tales of Gothic horror.

Lovecraft was an intelligent but sickly child who grew into a gaunt, pale adult. He suffered a nervous breakdown prior to his high school graduation and never received his diploma. Although today he is regarded by fans as one of the greatest literary geniuses of the 20th century, he was never financially successful in his own time, partly due to his own unwillingness. He was friends with many other writers of his day, including most famously Robert E. Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian.

He was briefly married to a woman named Sonia Greene and lived with her in New York City, where he was famously miserable.

Lovecraft returned to Providence in 1926 and lived there until his death in 1937. He was diagnosed with cancer of the small intestine and died in poverty.

Today the images of H. P. Lovecraft and his most famous creation, the monster Cthulhu, are well known to gamers. Cthulhu appears on t-shirts, in board games, card games, roleplaying games, and video games. He is credited as an inspiration by many, many horror and fantasy writers, and filmmakers who came after him. And yet his name is relatively unknown outside of geek and gamer culture, probably less recognizable to the general public than Edgar Allen Poe and Steven King.

My guests:

Dan Cmil - The Doom That Came to Sarnath; From Beyond

Jeffrey Wikstrom - The Temple

website - jeffwik.com

email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Jay Kint - The Music of Erich Zann

blog - expertisedice.com

Twitter - @icosahedron

Email us to find out how you can get involved!

http://www.thetomeshow.com

thetomeshow@gmail.com

Geoffrey Winn

gdwinn@comcast.net

Support the show, shop below...



Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 8 - The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

Jeff Wikstrom and I discuss The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany. A prince of the normal world brings home an Elf princess to be his wife, but it doesn’t turn out quite like everyone hand planned.

Dunsany, Lord. The Book of Wonder, The Essential Lord Dunsany Collection, The Gods of Pegana, The King of Elfland’s Daughter, Lord Dunsany Compendium, and The Sword of Welleran and Other Tales.

Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany
born 1878, died 1957

Lord Dunsany was an Irish writer and dramatist, notable for his work, mostly in fantasy, published under the name Lord Dunsany. More than eighty books of his work were published, and his oeuvre includes many hundreds of published short stories, as well as successful plays, novels and essays. He is considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, and Ursula K. Le Guin.

Born to the second-oldest title (created 1439) in the Irish peerage, Dunsany lived much of his life at perhaps Ireland’s longest-inhabited home, Dunsany Castle near Tara, worked with W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, received an honorary doctorate from Trinity College, was chess and pistol-shooting champion of Ireland, and travelled and hunted extensively. He died in Dublin after an attack of appendicitis.

Dunsany began writing in the late 1890s and "burst onto the publishing scene" with The Gods of Pegana in 1905. His first stories were set in an invented world with its own gods, history and geography.

Dunsany eventually began writing novels and his most well-known novel, The King of Elfland's Daughter, was published in 1924 and is the inspiration of Neil Gaiman's film, Stardust.

Next we will be reading:
The Doom That Came to Sarnath, From Beyond, The Temple, The Music of Erich Zann, Herbert West - Reanimator, The Lurking Fear, The Rats in the Walls and The Call of Cthulhu by H. P. Lovecraft - http://cthulhu.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Fiction
Dwellers in the Mirage by Abraham Merritt - http://www.gutenberg.net.au/ebooks01/0100151.txt

My guest:
Jeffrey Wikstrom
website - jeffwik.com
email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Support the show, shop below...


Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 7 - The Moon Pool by Abraham Merritt

My guest and I discuss The Moon Pool by Abraham Merritt. An international group of scientists and explorers investigate a mysterious alien being that snatches innocent travelers in the South Pacific and ends up discovering a lost underground civilization.

 

www.nobleknight.com

Vault of the Drow by Gary Gygax — $22

 

Merrit, A.: CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al

 

“The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merrit”

 

Abraham Merritt

born 1884, died 1943

 

Wikipedia names H. Rider Haggard, Robert W. Chambers, Helena Blavatsky and Gertrude Barrows Bennett (writing as Francis Stevens) as “heavy influences.”

 

He was a major influence on Appendix N authors H. P. Lovecraft and Michael Moorcock. He was referenced in the Lensman series by E. E. Smith.

 

Born in Beverly, New Jersey. Primarily a journalist. Assistant editor of The American Weekly from 1912 to 1937 and then editor until his death in 1943.

 

Merritt’s first fantasy story was “Through the Dragon Glass” (1917)

 

The Moon Pool originally appeared in All-Story Weekly as two short stories “The Moon Pool” (1918) and “Conquest of the Moon Pool” (1919). Later reworked into a novel, apparently something of the original story was lost. Writes Lovecraft in 1934: Merritt is certainly great stuff — he has a subtle command of an unique type of strangeness which no one else has been able to parallel.  You are absolutely right in considering his original Moon Pool novelette — as published in the All-Story for June 22, 1918 — his best work.  The sequel — The Conquest of the Moon Pool — was relatively commonplace and tainted with the atmosphere of cheap popular fiction.  It is a major crime that many of the best touches were taken out of the novelette when it was fused with its sequel to form the ultimate book version.

 

Nan Madol - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nan_Madol

 

Next we will be reading:

The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany -http://www.fadedpage.com/books/20120938/20120938.html

The Doom That Came to Sarnath, From Beyond, The Temple, The Music of Erich Zann, Herbert West - Reanimator, The Lurking Fear, The Rats in the Walls and The Call of Cthulhu by H. P. Lovecraft -http://cthulhu.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Fiction

Dwellers in the Mirage by Abraham Merritt - http://www.gutenberg.net.au/ebooks01/0100151.txt

 

Geoffrey Winn
gdwinn@comcast.net

 

Support the show, shop below...


Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 6 - Pellucidar by Edgar Rice Burroughs

With my guest Jeff Wikstrom I discuss Pellucidar, ironically the second book in the Pellucidar series. David Innes returns to Pellucidar, this time with guns!

www.nobleknight.com

Hollow Earth Expedition by Jeff Combos — $17.95

 

Edgar Rice Burroughs

born 1875, died 1950

 

At the Earth’s Core published as a four-part serial April 1914 in All-Story Weekly

Inspired HP Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, Lin Carter’s Zanthodon series, and manga artist Shotaro Ishinomori Cyborg 009 (1964-1981)

 

Pellucidar published as a four-part serial May 1915 in All-Story Weekly

 

Jeffrey Wikstrom

website - jeffwik.com

email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Email us to find out how you can get involved!

http://www.thetomeshow.com

thetomeshow@gmail.com

Geoffrey Winn

gdwinn@comcast.net

Like the show? support by shopping below...

Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 5 - At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs

In this episode we discuss At the Earth’s Core, the first story in the Pellucidar series by Edgar Rice Burroughs. In this story, hero David Innes and his scientist friend Abner Perry travel to the world of Pellucidar that lies within the Earth itself.

Hollow World Campaign Set by TSR — $18.00

Edgar Rice Burroughs
born 1875, died 1950

At the Earth’s Core published as a four-part serial April 1914 in All-Story Weekly
Inspired HP Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, Lin Carter’s Zanthodon series, and manga artist Shotaro Ishinomori Cyborg 009 (1964-1981)

Jeffrey Wikstrom
website - jeffwik.com
email - jeffwik@gmail.com

Coming soon!
Pellucidar by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Moon Pool by Abraham Merrit
The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany
and in October, we begin reviewing the short stories of H. P. Lovecraft

Email us to find out how you can get involved!

thetomeshow@gmail.com

Geoffrey Winn
gdwinn@comcast.net

Like the show? Shop below...


Dungeons & Dragons Classics


The Appendix N Podcast - Episode 4 - The Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

In this episode we discuss The Warlord of Mars, the follow-up to The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. In this story we are introduced to the Yellow Men and our hero finally reunited with his long-lost princess.

Dark Sun (Revised and Expanded) by TSR — $32.00

Edgar Rice Burroughs
born 1875, died 1950

A Princess of Mars — February to July 1912
The Gods of Mars — January to May 1913
The Warlord of Mars — December 1913 to March 1914

Jay Kint
RPG Circus - rpgcircus.com
Twitter - @icosahedron

Coming soon!
At the Earth’s Core and Pellucidar by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Moon Pool by Abraham Merrit
The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

Email us to find out how you can get involved!


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